[Going Commando, 528 words, Genre: Mind Fudge]

* Image courtesy of Dirk de Bruyn

The Australians were entering into a new contract with the Chinese. It was a new business deal. The Chinese who had developed a rich and ancient history, all embedded with a rich culture and ancient traditions. The Chinese took these matters very seriously. They were a very cultured people. The Australians were coming into fruition as a country and as a continent of their own. With the rest of the world in turmoil, they had to develop themselves and put their best foot forward. If a foreigner ever greets an Australian they will often come into the juxtaposition that their speech is vulgar and underdeveloped. For a country that has developed its federation in the nineteen hundreds, they were only beginning to see themselves as their own separate entity established beyond the point of the British empire. They would forever belong to the British Empire, for they shared the same language and cultural roots that could not be ignored.

They shared much with the British, but they had to establish themselves and their own cultural conditions in the larger expanse of history. Cultural traditions are odd things. They are often invented by some madman or madwomen in the context of covering up their own mistakes and faults. Or as a sign of prestige and class.

As the Chinese delegates prepared their own meals and special herbal teas for the meeting in some sort of ancient tradition and meeting of the minds the Australians were at a loss. All of the fanciness and bourgeois society was not for them. Or it was, in some circles. In most circles they developed a worship of strength and physical ability. The insane were often considered as a pestilence that plagued society. And for the most part they were… But they could often make a quick quip here or there. A joke that would entertain and escalate, developing smiles of humour and laughs amongst friends. A good sense of humour often went hand in hand with humility. And at times with developing relations with others, it is always at best to be humble. To realize one’s own mistakes and take account of the fact that we’re all human.

The Australian delegates did not know what to do. This was not a football arena. They needed something to identify themselves. To separate themselves from the other countries.

“Shit guys, what do we do?”

“I don’t know… We can’t exactly identify ourselves as convicts anymore. We’ve gone through the whole colonial thing.”

“What do we do?”

“I’ve got an idea.”

“What’s your idea?”

“We’ll go commando.”

“Commando… What’s that?”

“Well, we just take off our underpants every time we go into a business meeting.”

“What the hell!”

“Why the hell would we do that?”

“It’s our thing isn’t it?”

“I guess so…”

So all the business delegates went into the business meeting. They all took off their underpants and hung them up in the bathroom cupboard. Luckily for them, they all wore boxer shorts and not white linens… Otherwise, y’know stains…

So they went into the business meeting to greet the foreign delegates.

“Can you feel that breeze mate? Those are the winds of change.”

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Arie de Bruyn Born in Sandringham, Melbourne, Victoria (Australia) on the 15th January 1987. Son of Alison and Dirk de Bruyn. Youngest sibling to Kees and Abram de Bruyn. Diagnosed with schizophrenia at the age of 22. Holds a bachelor degree from Deakin University in Arts (Media & Communication). Attended several high schools. Has lived and worked internationally in New Delhi, India; and Thailand. Currently resides in Geelong, Victoria, Australia. Written several books and self-published them (Check out products and downloads page). Works jobs to earn himself a livable wage. contact: firstofkin@hotmail.com twitter: @firstofkin

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